What you spend your time on

There’s a golden rule in screenwriting: Anything you spend much time on will amount to something in the story.

The problem with many presentations is that the presenter spends an enormous amount of time on an enormous amount of details that don’t amount to anything in the end. Well, actually, the biggest problem is that often there isn’t even a story in the first place.

A much better approach is this: Start by asking yourself what your story is and then include exactly those details that are required to tell the story. If a detail doesn’t amount to anything of significance in your story, leave it out. If, on the other hand, it’s highly important for a key part of your story then treat it that way.

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Dr. Michael Gerharz

Dr. Michael Gerharz